MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

Patient: Without Ketamine, ‘I would welcome death at any point’

Sep 27, 2018, 7:15 AM | Updated: 7:24 am

AMERICAN FORK — More clinics throughout Utah are providing Ketamine, an anesthetic used to medically induce sleep in patients for surgery, to fight depression.

No remedy has lasted more than six months for one woman who has been fighting major depressive disorder.

“I’ve been on over 25 medications and combinations, and it’s been over 20 years of my life, and just really, really hard,” she said, wishing to remain anonymous.

Five months ago, she told her husband, “I couldn’t do anymore. I wasn’t necessarily going to harm myself. It’s just that I would welcome death at any point.”

Ketamine treatment was the last resort for her and she has since had several intravenous infusions since that stark talk.

She now says, “The best way I can describe it is ‘life-changing’ for me.”

She’s a patient at the Utah Ketamine Clinic in American Fork, founded six months ago, owned and operated by Zachary Taylor and Ryan Blaney.

“We do a little bit of a health screening to make sure they are eligible,” Taylor said. “We don’t just want people coming in off of the street for Ketamine.”

These certified registered nurse anesthetists work day jobs and run the clinic at night.

“We have a nice big chair that they can sit on, blankets, music available that they can listen to so that while they’re here, they can feel comfortable and safe,” Taylor showed. “They feel like they can allow their brains and minds to heal.”

Their equipment monitors all vital signs, as the IV pumps Ketamine slowly, for 45 minutes per treatment.

“You’re going to have people that naysay, people that don’t believe literature, and people that don’t feel that it’s safe,” Blaney said, mainly due to Ketamine being repurposed from a sedative to a depression treatment.

“Most of our results, I would say, come pretty rapidly,” he added.

“It seems to help rewire and increase connections within mood-regulating circuits of the brain,” said Dr. Paul Carlson, co-founder of the Ketamine Clinic at University of Utah’s Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI).

He says oral, internasal, and intermuscular forms of Ketamine are in development but “maintaining the response with Ketamine is the biggest challenge.”

So far, several treatments are required to improve response but as our anonymous patient testifies, the anesthetic/antidepressant clears the bad thoughts just enough.

“I am able to now cope in a different way because my perspective has changed and my mind has opened to a different way,” she said.

She’ll continue the Ketamine treatments indefinitely, just like her family members also fighting major depressive disorder.

Dr. Carlson, Taylor, and Blaney all stress that this treatment should be used when other treatments have failed depression patients.

Today’s Top Stories

Mental Health Resources

Gov. Cox Ukraine State of the Union...
Mark Jones

May 7 declared as Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day in Utah

Gov. Spencer Cox declared Saturday, May 7 as Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day in Utah.
16 days ago
mental health daylight exposure...
Jacob Rueda

Researchers say mental health affected by daylight exposure

With daylight saving time possibly becoming permanent, researchers say daylight exposure can affect mental health, and more darkness during winter might be harmful,
2 months ago
Suicide prevention concert at the Maverik Center...
Jacob Rueda

Utah mental health centers ready for switch to new 988 number

Utah mental health facilities are preparing for an upgrade to the national suicide prevention number from a 10-digit number to a three-digit number.
2 months ago
A family photo shows Isabella “Izzy” Tichenor, who at 10 years old died by suicide over the sec...
Aimee Cobabe and Kira Hoffelmeyer

Lawmakers approve bill inspired by Izzy Tichenor to track who gets bullied at school

Utah lawmakers passed a bill to require school officials to collect data on kids who are getting bullied. That data would include the victim's demographics.
3 months ago
TikTok teen...
Curt Gresseth

Is TikTok hurting your teen? Parents can help says counselor

Parents can help their teen make better decisions about their interactions with social media platforms like TikTok.
3 months ago
TikTok ban...
Curt Gresseth

Is it time for parents to remove kids from social media?

The Granite School District asks parents to take their children off social media if they can't monitor their kids' use of the apps.
4 months ago

Sponsored Articles

Curb Appeal...
Price's Guaranteed Doors

How to have the best of both worlds for your house | Home security and curb appeal

Protect your home and improve its curb appeal with the latest security solutions like beautiful garage doors and increased security systems.
Prescription opioids can be disposed of during National Prescription Take Back Day...
Know Your Script

Prescription opioid misuse | How to protect your family from the opioid epidemic

Studies have shown that prescription opioid misuse has increased since COVID-19. So what do you need to know about these opioids?
...

Tax Tuesday: The Most Common Mistakes People Make When Filing Their Taxes

Fortunately, for most average earners, they will not end up owing overpayments received for the Child Tax Credit in 2021.
...

Tax Tuesday: How will last year’s child tax credits affect you?

Fortunately, for most average earners, they will not end up owing overpayments received for the Child Tax Credit in 2021.
...

Tax Tuesday: Key Information Before the Filing Deadline

Businesses can receive a credit of up to $5,000 per employee in 2020 and up to $21,000 per employee in 2021.
national heart month...
Intermountain Healthcare

National Heart Month: 5 Lifestyle Changes to Make Today to Keep You Heart Healthy

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. One person dies every 36 seconds in the United States from cardiovascular disease
Patient: Without Ketamine, ‘I would welcome death at any point’