COVID-19-UTAH RESPONSE

Majority of US workers want to continue working from home, survey shows

May 11, 2020, 10:29 AM
working from home...
A new survey from getAbstract reflects ongoing predictions that the workplace may never look the same after the pandemic -- making it "almost impossible" to return to what is was before.  (Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

A recent study conducted by getAbstract shows that a majority of U.S. employees would prefer to continue working from home even after the pandemic subsides. Nearly 43% of survey respondents reported they want to change their work schedules after businesses begin to reopen, transitioning to remote work. 

The survey reflects ongoing predictions that the workplace may never look the same after the pandemic — making it “almost impossible” to return to what is was before. 

The online survey was conducted between April 16-17 and included more than 1,200 full-time employees in the U.S. — all of which are working remotely amid the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders. Respondents represented roughly an equal number of men and women, ranging across the scale of income levels and careers. 

“Our survey is the tip of the iceberg on the seismic, long term changes the coronavirus pandemic is bringing to how people work, cities develop and employers invest in offices and technology,” said Andrew Savikas, chief strategy officer, in a statement.

Benefits of working from home

Of those participants, about half reported they had not worked from home prior to the pandemic. However, a majority of those employees note they want to continue working from home. 

Here’s why: 

  • 55.27% said it’s because they don’t have to commute
  • 48.32% said it’s because their schedule is more flexible 
  • 36.79% said it’s because they’re more productive
  • 34.27% said it’s because they have more time for family and friends
  • 30.46% said it’s because they have more time for hobbies or exercising
  • 27.79% said it’s because their performance is better
  • 20% said they don’t want to work remotely
  • 3.59% reported other reasons

The downsides

Despite the high number of employees wanting to work from home, they acknowledge there are some downsides. About 27% report working remotely causes them to feel isolated, with roughly 19% saying it’s difficult to feel connected to the company. 

Other employees (20.08%) report telecommuting technology “doesn’t always work well,” which would prompt them to return to their physical office. 

“Virus-related health and safety concerns, however, were not top-of-mind for a majority of respondents,” according to the study. “Only 25% said they did not feel safe returning to the office after the pandemic.”

Today’s Top Stories

COVID-19-Utah response

BYU study COVID money...
Martha Harris

BYU study says ‘going cashless was useless’ during height of pandemic

Many businesses went to a cash-only model at the start of the pandemic. A recent BYU study found the effort made little impact.
4 days ago
Flags are ordered to be lowered...
Amie Schaeffer

Flags lowered to honor lives lost to COVID-19

In accordance with an order from President Biden, Gov. Cox authorized flags lowered through May 16. The order is meant to honor lives lost to the virus.
5 days ago
Utah national parks no longer have a mask mandate...
Chandler Holt

Masks no longer required in national parks

Since a federal judge struck down the CDC's transportation mask mandate, guests in national parks can choose if they'd like to wear a mask or not.
27 days ago
Photo of two 'mask required' signs...
Associated Press

CDC to extend federal travel mask mandate

CDC to extend travel mask mandate for two weeks to monitor uptick in COVID-19 cases.
1 month ago
Utah begings using wastewater to track components of the COVID-19 virus in communities...
Dan Bammes

Monitoring COVID-19 virus in Utah through wastewater

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah is monitoring levels of the COVID-19 virus components in sewage at wastewater treatment plants across the state. While it’s a useful early warning system, Utah’s state epidemiologist says it’s just one of the tools they have for monitoring COVID-19 infections in the community. Last year, when the Delta variant showed […]
1 month ago
(A testing site operated by Nomi Health across the street from UDOH headquarters.  Photo: Paul Nels...
Paul Nelson

Federal health officials investigating Utah-based company over COVID-19 testing

A Utah-based company is being investigating for claims of substandard conditions at COVID-19 testing sites.
2 months ago

Sponsored Articles

Curb Appeal...
Price's Guaranteed Doors

How to have the best of both worlds for your house | Home security and curb appeal

Protect your home and improve its curb appeal with the latest security solutions like beautiful garage doors and increased security systems.
Prescription opioids can be disposed of during National Prescription Take Back Day...
Know Your Script

Prescription opioid misuse | How to protect your family from the opioid epidemic

Studies have shown that prescription opioid misuse has increased since COVID-19. So what do you need to know about these opioids?
...

Tax Tuesday: The Most Common Mistakes People Make When Filing Their Taxes

Fortunately, for most average earners, they will not end up owing overpayments received for the Child Tax Credit in 2021.
...

Tax Tuesday: How will last year’s child tax credits affect you?

Fortunately, for most average earners, they will not end up owing overpayments received for the Child Tax Credit in 2021.
...

Tax Tuesday: Key Information Before the Filing Deadline

Businesses can receive a credit of up to $5,000 per employee in 2020 and up to $21,000 per employee in 2021.
national heart month...
Intermountain Healthcare

National Heart Month: 5 Lifestyle Changes to Make Today to Keep You Heart Healthy

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. One person dies every 36 seconds in the United States from cardiovascular disease
Majority of US workers want to continue working from home, survey shows