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Only about 2,000 people speak the Cherokee language fluently. The tribe is saving some vaccine doses for them

Jan 12, 2021, 6:10 AM
Tim King, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and a fluent Cherokee language speaker, receives a COVID...
Tim King, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and a fluent Cherokee language speaker, receives a COVID-19 vaccination at the Cherokee Nation Outpatient Health Center in Tahlequah on Thursday. On his left arm is a tattoo of a dream catcher with the word for his tribe in Cherokee.

    (CNN) — Even before the pandemic hit, the Cherokee Nation was dealing with a crisis: the potential disappearance of its native language.

Only about 2,000 people alive on this earth can speak the Cherokee language fluently. And as Covid-19 began to spread, that number started to dwindle.

So when the Cherokee Nation began receiving shipments of the Covid-19 vaccine, the tribal government identified Cherokee speakers as among the first groups to be eligible for the shot.

“When you lose a speaker and you’re a tribe that has only 2,000 fluent speakers left, you’ve lost something that isn’t just irreplaceable, as all life is, but is really a national treasure,” Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. told CNN. “Whether they survive and whether they pass down their knowledge will help determine in a couple of generations if there is a Cherokee language left.”

Vaccinating Cherokee language speakers alongside frontline health care workers is just the latest effort the tribe has made during the pandemic to keep this treasured population safe.

And in doing so, the Cherokee Nation is not only protecting some of most revered citizens, but also ensuring the survival of its culture and identity.

About 30 Cherokee speakers have died of Covid-19

In relative terms, the Cherokee Nation has fared much better than other tribes and many parts of the US in controlling the spread of the virus.

The Cherokee Nation, with about 141,000 citizens living on its reservation in northeastern Oklahoma, has reported a total of more than 11,800 Covid-19 cases and 66 deaths as of January 8. But about 30 of the people lost were native Cherokee speakers, Hoskin said.

“When I took office, preserving our language and revitalizing it was a high priority,” he said. “In the midst of Covid, knowing what we’re losing, it just tells me that that’s the right priority and we need to emphasize it even more.”

The first 975 doses of Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine arrived in the Cherokee Nation on December 14. The next morning, the tribe started vaccinating frontline health care workers at its health complex in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

Three days later, the tribe began administering the shot to Cherokee language speakers.

The Cherokee Nation already had a record of its living first language speakers, thanks to an effort Hoskin initiated in 2018 when he was the tribe’s Secretary of State. So its staff started contacting those listed in the speaker roll book to let them know they could now schedule an appointment to receive the Covid-19 vaccine.

More than 600 speakers have been vaccinated so far, according to the tribe. The aim is to vaccinate 1,000 by the end of the week.

On January 4, the Cherokee Nation also announced it was beginning vaccinations for elders aged 65 and older.

Prioritizing the vaccination of Cherokee speakers and elders has also had an unintended consequence: It has built trust in the vaccine among other citizens of the Cherokee Nation.

Hoskin said he’s seen some hesitation among Cherokee Nation citizens about taking the vaccine. But the tribe’s decision to vaccinate native speakers early helped ease the anxieties that some people might have otherwise had, he added.

“People revere elders in the Cherokee Nation,” he said. “I think when they saw that group of people being made a high priority and celebrating it, that surely has built some confidence.”

She’s seen the pandemic’s toll firsthand

Sandra Turner got her first vaccine dose in December and received her booster shot last week.

Turner, 64, grew up speaking Cherokee at home in a family of 11 children. Until about first or second grade, she didn’t even know English. And even then, she and the many other Cherokee students at her school would speak to each other in the language they knew best.

Today, people like her are rare.

Turner, who lives in Salina, Oklahoma, knows firsthand the threat that Covid-19 poses to her mother tongue. Just last week, she attended the funeral of her children’s father, who died of the virus and spoke the language fluently like herself.

So when Turner received an email informing her that she could receive the Covid-19 vaccine, she says she was grateful.

“We have been losing a lot of our fluent speakers due to the virus,” she said. “And I was ready. I said, ‘I’m getting in line.'”

As one of the few people left whose first language was Cherokee, John Ross, 65, says he felt a responsibility to get the shot as soon as it was available to him.

Ross, who lives in Fort Gibson, Oklahoma, is a translator for the Cherokee Nation. He’s actively worked to preserve the language he grew up with, including getting Cherokee on Microsoft Office programs and making vaccine information from Pfizer and Moderna available in Cherokee. And it’s important that that work continues.

“As a Cherokee speaker, there’s probably less than 2,000 speakers left like me that’s alive on the face of this earth,” he said. “They want to keep us as long as we can because we try to help out to preserve our language to the young ones or whoever wants to learn.”

Fortunately for those interested in learning Cherokee, Ross received his final dose of the vaccine last week.

The-CNN-Wire
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How To Prevent the Spread of COVID-19 Coronavirus

COVID-19 coronaviruses transmitted from person to person. It is a virus that is similar to the common cold and the flu. So, to prevent it from spreading:

  • Wash hands frequently and thoroughly, with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds.
  • Wear a mask.
  • Don’t touch your face.
  • Keep children and those with compromised immune systems away from someone who is coughing or sneezing (in this instance, at least six feet)
  • If there is an outbreak near you, practice social distancing (stay at home, instead of going to the movies, sports events, or other activities.)
  • Get a flu shot.

Local resources

KSL Coronavirus Q&A

Utah’s Coronavirus Information

Utah State Board of Education

Utah Hospital Association

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Utah Coronavirus Information Line – 1-800-456-7707

National Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Commonly asked questions, World Health Organization

Cases in the United States

 

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Only about 2,000 people speak the Cherokee language fluently. The tribe is saving some vaccine doses for them