GOVERNMENT

Temporary stay issued for Utah’s trigger law

Jun 27, 2022, 12:54 PM | Updated: Jun 29, 2022, 3:28 pm
The University of Utah, U of U, Health has opened a new rapid contraception clinic, to give people ...
Protesters hold signs and chant at the Utah Capitol in Salt Lake City on Friday, June 24, 2022, as they protest the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn of Roe v. Wade. Health officials say they saw increased demand for contraception after the ruling. (Scott G. Winteron/Deseret News)
(Scott G. Winteron/Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah judge has granted a temporary restraining order putting the state’s new abortion trigger law on hold.

Planned Parenthood of Utah filed the lawsuit on Saturday, arguing the trigger law violates the state constitution.

The law will be on hold for 14 days while the lawsuit continues through the legal process.

ACLU of Utah had this to say on Twitter.

Late Monday afternoon, Pro-Life Utah issued a statement in response to the temporary restraining order issued Monday.

“We are deeply saddened by today’s ruling by the Third District Court permitting abortion to continue in the state of Utah,” the statement from Pro-Life Utah read. “Dozens of babies will now die as a result of this decision.  However, we are confident that Utah’s law to protect the unborn will be ultimately affirmed.  We invite any woman considering abortion to reach out to ProLifeUtah.org for help and support.”

Planned Parenthood of Utah also issued a statement following Monday’s court ruling.

“We’re grateful for this temporary restraining order that will allow abortion services to resume in Utah,” said Karrie Galloway, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Association of Utah. “The Supreme Court ruling was devastating and terrifying for our patients and providers, but at least for now, Utahns will be able to get the care they need. Today is a win, but it is only the first step in what will undoubtedly be a long and difficult fight. Planned Parenthood will always stand alongside our patients and providers, no matter what.”

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Temporary stay issued for Utah’s trigger law