HEALTH

With the summer heat, comes health concerns and needed help for vulnerable

Jul 28, 2022, 9:00 PM
sun burn...
With record-breaking heat comes health risks and help for the vulnerable.

SALT LAKE CITY — As Utahns continue to deal with the heat of the summer months, there are several health risks that come with it that residents may not be equipped to deal with.

According to a recent study, the human body can only handle heat up to 95 degrees. After that, a person’s health can rapidly decline, leading to issues such as blood clots or heatstroke. People who have chronic diseases and are required to take medication daily are at a higher risk.

Dr. Jose Rodriguez, of the University of Utah Health, says consumption of water is the best way to avoid any health issues related to heat.

“Anything you can do to keep cool is going to be a benefit,” he said. “Wear clothes to protect you from the sun. Drink lots and lots and lots of water. And when I say lots of water, I mean water. I don’t mean Gatorade, I don’t mean anything else.”

Those most vulnerable to the summer heat

The people who are the most vulnerable to the record-breaking heat are the homeless.

Randy Chappell, of Catholic Community Services of Utah, says his organization is doing all it can to help the homeless during the summer heat. However, donations are needed.

“We do get donations of water now and then,” he said.

Chappell says his organization has drinking fountains that allow for bottles to be filled and are handing out bottles of water.

Additionally, other summertime necessities are also in need, according to Chappell.

“Sunscreen is the thing we are always looking for as well,” he said. “And I think all of the homeless service providers are in need of the same things when it comes to summer months.”

Mark Jones contributed to this article.

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With the summer heat, comes health concerns and needed help for vulnerable