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Is it time to change careers? 41% of workers are considering it.

FILE - In this Saturday, March 14, 2020 file photo, an Apple logo adorns the facade of the downtown Brooklyn Apple store in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

SALT LAKE CITY — If you are out of a job, would you be willing to change careers? Not jobs but careers.

A recent study from Microsoft found that 41% of workers are thinking about leaving their jobs this year. What are the common reasons for a career change. Is that something you may need to consider with the current job environment in the state of Utah?

What is up-skilling?

Marni Baker Stein, provost and chief academic officer with Western Governors University, said a change in careers doesn’t necessarily mean going back to school.

“I know you’re an expert leader in skills. We’re learning new terms: skills, re-skilling, up-skilling. What does that mean?” Dave asked.

“Fundamentally, it means that we’re no longer going to be able to front-load our education when we’re 18 to 24 years old and then expect that that degree is going to just last us,” Stein said. “We are looking at a lifetime of developing skills and competencies, but not only that, making sure that they’re verified. The transferability of skills from one industry to another is a big part of what skilling and re-skilling and up-skilling are all about.”

Degree no longer necessary to change careers

“Tell us about ways to change careers without having to go back to school for four years,” Debbie said.

“There really is no question that higher education and degrees still factors into career success,” Stein said, “but nearly 60 to 70% of the jobs out there do not require a four-year degree. These employers are looking for high-demand, technical and professional skill sets that can be verified that they can get some proof of. Increasingly, there are more and more renowned and really big prestigious companies that no longer require a college degree to work for them, including IBM and Apple and GE and Google.”

“One of the things I love that she said, Debbie is, it’s no longer sufficient to front-load your education from 18 to 24 and think that you’re just golden for the rest of your life,” Dave said. “You need to acquire skills and continue learning throughout your career, so that you are capable, available and skilled throughout your entire career.

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