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Man wanted in Brooklyn subway attack arrested, official says

Apr 13, 2022, 12:07 PM | Updated: 12:49 pm
This image provided by the New York City Police Department shows a Crime Stoppers bulletin displayi...
This image provided by the New York City Police Department shows a Crime Stoppers bulletin displaying photos of Frank R. James, who has been identified by police as the renter of a U-Haul van possibly connected to the Brooklyn subway shooting, in New York, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Mayor Eric Adams said Wednesday, April 13, that officials were now seeking James as a suspect. (Courtesy of NYPD via AP)
(Courtesy of NYPD via AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — The man arrested in the shooting of 10 people on a Brooklyn subway has been charged with a federal terrorism offense.

The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, Breon Peace, announced the charge against Frank R. James, 62, at a press conference Wednesday afternoon. James was taken into custody in Manhattan’s East Village neighborhood shortly before the presser.

James is accused in the Tuesday attack on a crowded rush-hour train. Five people were in critical condition after the morning shooting, but all 10 gunshot victims were expected to survive.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below.

NEW YORK (AP) — A man wanted in an attack on a subway train in Brooklyn that left 10 people wounded by gunfire was arrested Wednesday afternoon, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press.
Frank R. James, 62, was taken into custody in Manhattan, the official said. Further details, including the arresting agency, weren’t immediately available.

Investigators had announced Tuesday afternoon that they were searching for James, who was believed to have rented a van possibly connected to the violence. By Wednesday morning, New York authorities said he was a suspect in the shooting itself.

Authorities were examining social media videos in which the 62-year-old decried the U.S. as a racist place awash in violence and railed against New York City’s mayor, Eric Adams.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below.

NEW YORK (AP) — A man who posted numerous social media videos decrying the U.S. as a racist place awash in violence and recounting his struggle with mental illness remained at large Wednesday, a day after an attack on a subway train in Brooklyn left 10 people wounded by gunfire.

Mayor Eric Adams said in a series of media interviews that investigators now consider Frank R. James a suspect in the shooting. Police had initially said the 62-year-old was being sought for questioning because he had rented a van possibly connected to the attack, but weren’t sure whether he was responsible for the shooting.

Adams, speaking to NPR on Wednesday morning, did not offer details on why officials were now seeking James as a suspect beyond citing “new information that became available to the team.”

“We are going to continue to close the loop around him and bring him in, and continue the investigation into this horrific act against innocent New Yorkers,” the Democrat said on MSNBC.

The gunman sent off smoke grenades in a crowded subway car and then fired at least 33 shots with a 9 mm handgun, police said. Five gunshot victims were in critical condition but all 10 wounded in the shooting were expected to survive. At least a dozen others who escaped gunshot wounds were treated for smoke inhalation and other injuries.

The shooter escaped in the chaos, but left behind numerous clues, including the gun, ammunition magazines, a hatchet, smoke grenades, gasoline and the key to a U-Haul van.

That key led investigators to James, a New York City-area native who had more recent addresses in Philadelphia and Wisconsin.

Federal investigators determined the gun used in the shooting was purchased by James at a pawn shop — a licensed firearms dealer — in the Columbus, Ohio, area in 2011, said a law enforcement official who wasn’t authorized to discuss the investigation and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The van was found, unoccupied, near a station where investigators determined the gunman had entered the subway system. No explosives or firearms were found in the van, a law enforcement official said. Police did find other items, including pillows, suggesting he may have been sleeping or planned to sleep in the van, the official said.

Investigators believe James drove up from Philadelphia on Monday and have reviewed surveillance video showing a man matching his physical description coming out of the van early Tuesday morning, the official said. Other video shows James entering a subway station in Brooklyn with a large bag, the official said.

In addition to analyzing financial and telephone records connected to James, investigators have also been reviewing hours of rambling, profanity-filled videos James posted on YouTube and other social media platforms — replete with violent language and bigoted comments, some against other Black people — as they try to discern a motive.

In one video, posted a day before the attack, James criticizes crime against Black people and says drastic action is needed.

“You got kids going in here now taking machine guns and mowing down innocent people,” James says. “It’s not going to get better until we make it better,” he said, adding that he thought things would only change if certain people were “stomped, kicked and tortured” out of their “comfort zone.”

In another video he says, “this nation was born in violence, it’s kept alive by violence or the threat thereof and it’s going to die a violent death. There’s nothing going to stop that.”

Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell called the posts “concerning” and officials tightened security for Adams, who was already isolating following a positive COVID-19 test Sunday.

Several videos mention New York’s subways. A Feb. 20 video says the mayor and governor’s plan to address homelessness and safety in the subway system “is doomed for failure” and refers to himself as a “victim” of the city’s mental health programs. A Jan. 25 video criticizes Adams’ plan to end gun violence.

The Brooklyn subway station where passengers fled the smoke-filled train in the attack was open as usual Wednesday morning, less than 24 hours after the violence.

Commuter Jude Jacques, who takes the D train to his job as a fire safety director some two blocks from the shooting scene, said he prays every morning but had a special request on Wednesday.

“I said, ‘God, everything is in your hands,'” Jacques said. “I was antsy, and you can imagine why. Everybody is scared because it just happened.”
___
Balsamo reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Jim Mustian, Beatrice Dupuy, Karen Matthews, Julie Walker, Deepti Hajela, Michelle L. Price and David Porter in New York contributed to this report, and Michael Kunzelman contributed from College Park, Maryland.

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