UTAH DROUGHT

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints looks for ways to reduce water usage across it’s properties

Jun 22, 2022, 5:23 PM
Multiple Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints buildings are featured in the photo. The churc...
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day will begin to return to normal temple operations. Photo: Getty Images

SALT LAKE CITY- The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints released a statement today about cutting back on water usage across their properties.

Church Media Relations Manager, Kelly Smoot, issued a press release referring to the different circumstances members of the church live in.

“… throughout the world live in a variety of environmental circumstances. In one area, there may be serious drought, while in another wet conditions can cause significant flooding. In all regions and circumstances, we teach that we have a responsibility to care for and gratefully use what God has given, avoid wasting resources and wisely use the bounty of the earth to care for one another,” she said.

Also, Smoot addresses the drought much of the Western United States is experiencing.

How they plan to combat the drought

“Water conservation efforts continue to include the expansion of smart controllers, hydrometers, rain sensors, drip irrigation, and use of secondary or reclaimed water. Additionally, we have adjusted watering schedules to meet local government guidelines, and we continue to monitor the conditions of all of Church properties,” she said. 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reduced watering lawns at church buildings and the grounds at the temples. Smoot said some of the lawns will be allowed to brown and go dormant to reduce water usage. 

Historic church sites have reduced their water consumption by one-third.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints plans making landscape changes to permanently reduce water needs for their properties. They are planning to use lawns requiring less water, managing the water they use. They also want more native plants to beautify their properties.

“We all play a part in preserving the critical resources needed to sustain life — especially water — and we invite others to join us in reducing water use wherever possible. We gladly join with friends of other faiths in prayer to our Heavenly Father for rain and respite from the devastating drought,” said Smoot.

According to the Utah Division of Water Resources, UDWR, most of the state of Utah is in the category of ‘extreme drought.’

UDWR updates drought conditions and classifications weekly. Additionally, they fall under four different categories, moderate, severe, extreme, and exceptional drought. 

Bonneville International Corporation, the company that owns KSL NewsRadio, is a subsidiary of Deseret Management Corporation, which is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints looks for ways to reduce water usage across it’s properties